One Less God: The making of an honest film about terrorism

Immersion: Central Coast-based actor Joseph Mahler Taylor, in the role of Sean, an Irish backpacker, in the film One Less God.When Central Coast filmmaker Lliam Worthington set out to make a movie basedof the terrorist attack on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai in 2008, he tossed and turned about the best way to approach it.
成都桑拿

Worthington and co-producer Nelson Lau knew friendsinvolved in the tragedy, which saw terrorists kill 166 people and injured more than 600 over a three-day siege in the city, primarily in the stately old hotel. He read through accounts of survivors and others who described the carnage, the heroism and sheer terror of the event.

“I wrote lots of drafts,” he said, “but they were not active and truthful. They were survivor stories. They felt wrong and off. It took me sleepless nights to figure that out. There are some great stories of heroism and resilience.

“But the truth is, it is an overwhelming tragedy,” he said. “Most of the stories are of pain and suffering. To leave the audience in a happy place, the audience will park the story afterwards.”

One Less God trailerRather, Worthington chose to look closer at the issues confronting both the families of survivors, and the world overall. The pain had to be acknowledged, the basic question of mankind’s ability to survive such differences, such abhorrence, had to be present.

“For those people, who realise those questions are still facing us . . . once I realised that, it had to be truthful.”

The film,One Less God, wasshot over 63 days at the Carrington Hotel in Katoomba, and sets on the Central Coast and Sydneyas well as in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Challenge: One Less God film director Lliam Worthington on the set.

One Less Godwill screen on Saturday night at the Real Film Festival at Tower Cinemas on King Street, Newcastle. The session begins at 8pm and includes three short films. The movie, which is rated 18+, will be followed by a question and answer session with Worthington and other talent from the movie.

The movie won Best Film at the 2017 Byron Bay Film Festival and the Grand Jury Prize and Best Feature at the 2017 Dances with Films Festival in Los Angeles.

One Less Godfeatures an ensemble of mostly n actors, with the lead role of Sean, a backpacker strandedin the hotel, played by Joseph Mahler Taylor, an actor who also lives on the Central Coast.

The film is apolitical for the most part, with Worthington steering away from a blow-by-blow retelling of the sequence of events and government response and military action.

Instead, Worthington drills down on individuals.

House of war: A still from the movie One Less God, which is set during the 2008 siege of the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai, India.

There is a grandfather and his granddaughter, played by SukhRaj Deepak and Mihika Rao, who have come to the city to visit the little girl’s mother, who is dying of cancer in a hospital. While we watch the grandfather comfort and console the girl at points in the movie, things come to a head near the end of the movie when a pair of gun-toting terrorists knock on their hotel room door.

With so many people involved, there are thousands of stories. Worthington admitted: “as a storyteller, you have to cherry-pick a few”.

“The story of protecting a child –it’s not just a physical reality, but a psychological reality, to rear our children and move our children forward,” he said.

Working on a limited budget, and not being able to access Mumbai during the making of the film, created its own set of obstacles.

“A big part of the challenge, was making it seem big,” Worthington said. “It’s a theatre of the mind.”

One major tool was the use of news footage of the terrorist attack, which makes it instantly feel real and fraught with danger.

One Less God director Lliam WorthingtonHouse of War in other markets, has a running time of 133 minutes.

Itwas released in Japan last week. It has been sold into Korea, China, UK, USA and .

Made by New Realms Films, based on the Central Coast, it was financed without government assistance.

One Less God will show incinemas in India in November, exactly 10 years afterthe siege in Mumbai.

One Less God screens at the Real Film Festival, Tower Cinemas, Newcastle, at 8pm on Saturday, October 27, followed by a Q & A session with director Lliam Worthington.

SA leggie Pope sets Shield bowling record

Lloyd Pope, the youngest bowler to take seven wickets in a Sheffield Shield innings, is having a chuckle.
成都桑拿

The South n bagged a record-breaking 7-87 on Thursday against Queensland.

Pope is the only 18-year-old in the Shield’s 126-year history to capture seven wickets in an innings – he was oblivious to his record until told by a journalist.

But that’s not why he’s laughing.

Pope giggles when told he’s being called a saviour of n cricket – a cult hero; a star; prodigy; wizard.

Heck, some punters are even calling him a Test cricketer this summer – all this, before he finishes his second first-class game.

“Oh, right,” he said with a chuckle when told of social media reaction to his feat.

“I haven’t really checked my phone too much … a couple of my mates send me through some things. I think I am on Twitter but I don’t really use it too much.”

Pope’s stunning haul helped to bowl Queensland out for 231 at Adelaide Oval, with the Redbacks 0-39 at stumps on the opening day.

Aged 18 years and 328 days, he’s the youngest to collect seven wickets in a Shield innings, eclipsing the benchmark set by famed larrikin Doug Walters, who was 19 years and 50 days when taking 7-63 in 1964-65 for NSW.

“I wasn’t aware of that,” Pope said.

“I don’t really follow those statistics like that. I’m a cricket nuffie but I don’t sort of hunt through the books and look for records or things like that.

“That’s the first time I heard it. It’s pretty good, I guess.”

The self-effacing Pope still pinches himself that he’s even playing on the hallowed Adelaide Oval, let alone setting records.

“Just walking out there at the start of play and realising my name is on the scoreboard and that’s it happening – it’s an amazing feeling,” he said.

“It’s a strange feeling to have cameras and things in my face.

“But I try and take it both ways. I know some days it will be another bloke’s turn and they will take five-for.

“I just take it as it comes and, if it doesn’t, just try and keep working on my game.”

Three of Pope’s victims fell to vicious wrong’uns, including the prized scalp of top-scorer Joe Burns, who made 64.

All of Queensland’s batsmen had trouble picking his much-googled googly but the modest Pope put it down to luck.

“Some of them were a bit lucky off the wicket. Some were turning and some weren’t – favourable conditions,” he said.

Prudential regulator boss defends agency

The head of ‘s prudential regulator says his agency has not failed the community in its supervision of financial institutions, after a banking royal commission exposed widespread misconduct in the sector.
成都桑拿

n Prudential Regulation Authority chair Wayne Byres has told a hearing in Canberra that the regulator’s job is to ensure the financial system is safe and sound, and that is what it has done.

“There’s absolutely no case at all to say that we have failed,” he told a Senate estimates hearing on Thursday.

“There is no question that the financial system is sound and robust.”

His comments came under questioning by Labor senator Chris Ketter, who said APRA has been referred to as a “hear no evil, see no evil” regulator.

“I reject the depiction,” Mr Byres said.

Senator Ketter also said that the royal commission’s interim report, released last month, noted APRA has never taken a financial institution to court for misconduct.

Mr Byres said APRA’s enforcement measures go beyond legal action.

“I think we do use our tools to achieve change within the industry and to get problems rectified when we see them,” he said.

But he said the regulator is reviewing its “enforcement philosophy”, governance of enforcement decisions and the resources it commits to keeping institutions in line.

APRA has flagged in its submission to the royal commission that it could potentially employ stronger enforcement powers to achieve “general deterrence” across the industry, he added.

Mr Byres said robustness of the financial system hasn’t made evidence at the royal commission any less “confronting or uncomfortable”.

But the soundness of the system will help the financial sector make the improvements it needs to, he said.

“We are thankfully working on these from a position of financial strength.”

Royal commissioner Kenneth Hayne released a scathing three-volume interim report in September, highlighting an insidious culture of greed and profit over basic decency permeating the big banks.

He also took aim at regulators for cosying up to financial services firms and striking limp deals in response to systemic misbehaviour rather than pursuing tough prosecutions.

Shield wickets tumble on new-look MCG deck

The MCG drop-in wicket had become so flat, fast bowler Chris Tremain says even the batsmen were sick of it.
成都桑拿

But all that changed when 13 wickets tumbled on a dramatic opening day of the Victoria-NSW Sheffield Shield match.

Tremain snared 5-47 as Victoria won the toss and blasted NSW out for 159.

Victorian captain Peter Handscomb will be kicking himself for his cheap dismissal in the second-last over of Thursday’s play, given the state of the game and the Test batting spots on offer.

But the home side was still well-placed at 3-101, with opener Marcus Harris making 51no.

It is the first Victorian home match of the season and much of the pre-game focus was on how the pitch would play.

The ICC rated last year’s Ashes Boxing Day pitch as poor after the tame draw – the first time that has happened to an n Test venue. .

The last MCG Shield result was NSW’s innings win in February last year, with four draws since.

“After last season … I think we would rather see the game go two and a half days and get a result than bang out another draw,” Tremain said.

“Even the batsmen were sick of sitting in the field for two days.

“We could have pulled up stumps half way through a game there … if we were allowed to bet on cricket games we could have retired after the Test because there was no way that was going to be a result either.”

Tremain said the pitch still produced a tennis ball bounce during day one, but thought there was better carry through to the keeper even after lunch.

“It is lively, but it is ‘slow lively’,” he added of the noticeably-green deck.

After paceman Trent Copeland struck early to leave Victoria in trouble at 2-6, Harris and Handscomb combined for a crucial 93-run stand.

Handscomb made 48 before he chased a wide ball from leg-spinner Daniel Fallins a few minutes before stumps.

The edge bounced off the gloves of wicketkeeper Peter Nevill and Copeland took the catch at first slip.

Earlier, leg-spinner Fawad Ahmed’s 3-18 helped wrap up the NSW tail, while Scott Boland sparked the collapse by snaring the key wicket of teen sensation Jack Edwards immediately after lunch for 34.

Kurtis Patterson top-scored with 63.

NSW struck early trouble at 3-55, but steadied through a 50-run stand between Patterson and Edwards and were 3-103 at lunch.

Edwards fell in the second over after the break and that triggered a 7-56 collapse.

Dispute causes shutdown of crane at Newcastle TAFE site

Dispute causes crane shutdown at Hunter Street site Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil
成都桑拿

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

Police on scene at the Hunter Street TAFE Art School, where CFMEU Union Officials have shut down the site.. Picture: Marina Neil

TweetFacebookThe Herald understands the Boom Logistics crane company was originally approached to complete Thursday’s job aspart ofthe Hunter Street TAFE restoration project, but workers have since gone on strike.

“Mobile crane workers in Newcastle, Singleton, and Wollongongwho have not had a pay increase in more than five years, have launched an indefinite strike after the breakdown in talks with their employers,” a CFMEU statement said.

“More than 100 workers at Boom Logistics and WGC cranes have taken legally protected strike action because of the companies’ failure to offer a fair pay deal despite months of negotiations.”

Notified of the impending workplace action, the project contractor 3 Cross Pty Ltdbooked an alternative company to complete the job.

The works were halted for most of the day as police and Safe Work NSWwere called in to asses the site and negotiatebetween the parties.

Police are at the scene of a ‘demarcation’ dispute on Hunter Street pic.twitter成都夜总会招聘/N8cU7epLT1

— Newcastle Herald (@newcastleherald) October 25, 2018

Read the full report in tomorrow’s Herald.

READ MORE:Read more about the strike action here.

Farmers look to future at drought summit

Farmers are urging the federal government to look to the future as Prime Minister Scott Morrison prepares to reveal his latest plans to tackle the drought at a national summit.
成都桑拿

Mr Morrison has foreshadowed an announcement at Friday’s meeting in Canberra, where leaders and agriculture industry leaders will come together.

The National Farmers’ Federation wants a new agreement between commonwealth and state governments to provide a national approach to drought preparation, response and recovery.

NFF president Fiona Simson said while government support for the current drought was important, farmers would be better served by a holistic plan for dry times.

“I believe it is a well accepted view, from the prime minister down, that we can’t afford to continue to be reactive in responding to drought,” Ms Simson said.

The NFF will also propose effective and affordable agricultural insurance products be available to farmers to manage drought.

“We’re calling on the government to consider introducing a 150 per cent tax incentive for agricultural insurance premiums for five years,” Ms Simson said.

The bolstering and refinement of the Rural Financial Counselling Service and the Farm Household Allowance are also priorities for the NFF.

In an entree to the summit, Mr Morrison announced a $15 million grant program for regional community groups on Thursday.

Mr Morrison told reporters there would always be criticism of the government’s drought response inside the “Canberra bubble”, but communities backed more money to support local economies.

Ms Simson says the summit is a chance to get the farming sector together to take action on a long-term drought strategy.

“It is an opportunity not to be squandered.”

Agriculture Minister David Littleproud said the event would be a chance to review the government’s drought settings, praising Labor for their bipartisan approach to the issue.

“It’s important to understand the story of agriculture is still a good one – one of just add rain,” he told parliament.

A new drought finance task force bringing together major agricultural lenders, the government and the National Farmers’ Federation had its first meeting on Thursday.

NSW firearm amnesty nets thousands of guns

A sampling of the 8000 firearms turned in during a New South Wales gun amnesty.Police hope the 8300 weapons surrendered to NSW authorities during the latest gun amnesty will put a dent in the killing power of the state’s criminals.
成都桑拿

More than 1300 rifles, 400 shotguns and thousands of handguns were surrendered over the three months, NSW Police said on Thursday.

However, -wide there are still more privately owned guns and illicit firearms in circulation today than ever before.

University of Sydney gunpolicy成都模特佳丽招聘 research estimates there were more than 3.57 million legal and illegal firearms owned by civilians in in 2017.

In 1996, the year of the Port Arthur Massacre, there were an estimated 3.2 million guns, the research shows.

A historic 1851 navy six-chamber percussion revolver and eight .303 Lee Enfield bolt action repeater rifles were among the notable weapons handed in during the latest NSW amnesty.

About 80 per cent of the total guns collected were from regional areas with towns on Sydney’s fringe and farming communities identified as hotspots.

Police Deputy Commissioner Jeff Loy says the amnesty reduces opportunistic gun crime and lowers the risk of accidental shootings.

But he acknowledges criminals still seek out firearms for their trade.

“We understand that organised crime will always go to firearms for their criminal acts,” he told reporters in Sydney.

“But I think the community has shown very strong conviction today to really ensure that these (8300) firearms are off the streets of NSW.”

The Howard government’s gun buyback following the Port Arthur massacre saw the number of guns nationally drop by almost 700,000 but in the decades since the total has crept back up to surpass the previous all-time high.

Despite the increase in guns, the number of licensed firearms owners is close to its lowest point.

In the late 1980s, the last time there were more than 3.5 million guns in , there were more than 2.38 million licensed owners. But in 2016 there were just 816,000.

Data released by the ABC last year under freedom of information laws showed some residents of Sydney and Newcastle have assembled legal arsenals of up to 300 guns per person.

But the number of illicit firearms has also grown – last year there were an estimated 414,000 nationally, gunpolicy成都模特佳丽招聘 suggests.

Between 2006 and 2016 that number was hovering between 250,000 and 267,000.

NSW Police say the latest amnesty follows the success of a national operation in 2017 that resulted in nearly 25,000 guns being given up in NSW alone.

Mr Loy said getting a combined 33,000 guns out of circulation across the state was “a positive story”.

Catherine Hill Bay bowlo set to be demolished but long-term use of the club’s site remains unclear

VIEWS: Catherine Hill Bay Bowling and Community Club.Catherine Hill Bay Bowling and Community Club will be given a“last hurrah” on Saturdaybefore being demolished, but the long-term use of the coastal site remains uncleardespite plans for a new multi-use communityfacility.
成都桑拿

The club –built by locals and opened in 1954 – wasclosed by Lake Macquarie council in December because of asbestoscontamination. It wasslated for demolition this month.

The club had faced various financial battles over the years and closed brieflybefore being leased off council by community membersin 2012.

Up until itsclosure in December, ithad mainly been run by volunteerswhofocusedon social bowls, raffles and hostingevents, including weddings.

Now the picturesque club and its storied history is set to have one last community interactionon Saturday at ‘Farewell Catho Bowlo’.

‘Last hurrah’ for picturesque coastal bowling club WHAT A SPOT: Bowlers at the picturesque club in 2006. The Catherine Hill Bay Men’s Bowling Club still exists and plays out of Belmont.

AS IT STANDS: The now closed Catherine Hill Bay Bowling and Community Club. The building is set to be demolished in coming months and the site returned to natural parkland. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

HISTORY: Nancy Smyth with a picture of local WW1 soldiers which was salvaged from the club. The picture will be donated to an RSL. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

WHAT A SPOT: The club in 2006.

VINTAGE: Catherine Hill Bay Bowling Club in use in the mid-1950s.

BANDING TOGETHER: Life-long friends Sybil Mascord and Barb Martin, both of Catherine Hill Bay, in 2013. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

BANDING TOGETHER: Club secretary manager Lyn Hall prepares for the 2013 fundraiser for the RFS, following severe bush fires.

BANDING TOGTHER: A donations box on the bar in 2013. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

DESTRUCTION: Lyn Hall in scorched bush at the back of the club for a story about a fundraiser for local firefighters in 2013. Picture: Peter Stoop

STANDING TALL: Lyn Hall at the club in 2013 when it was struggling to stay open. Picture: Peter Stoop

STANDING TALL: Lyn Hall at the club in 2013 when it was struggling to stay open. Picture: Peter Stoop

TROUBLE: Lyn Hall with concerned members outside Catherine Hill Bay Bowling Club in 2011 when the club planned to close its doors. Picture: Phil Hearne

TROUBLE: Lyn Hall with concerned members outside Catherine Hill Bay Bowling Club in 2011 when the club planned to close its doors. Picture: Phil Hearne

RELIEF: The club are a Land and Environment court decision not to go ahead with a residential development in 2009.

RELIEF: The club are a Land and Environment court decision not to go ahead with a residential development in 2009.

RALLY: Debate over a resort development in 2002. Foreground Sybil Mascord. Picture: Brock Perks

CONCERNED: Fighting a rate rise in 2002 – Kate Northwood, 93, and Dorrie Trowbridge, 90, at the club. Both were life members who joined the club in the mid-1950 s. Picture: Darren Pateman

CONCERNED: Fighting a rate rise in 2002 – Kate Northwood, 93, and Dorrie Trowbridge, 90, at the club. Both were life members who joined the club in the mid-1950 s. Picture: Darren Pateman

VINTAGE: Catherine Hill Bay Bowling Club in use in the mid-1950s.

TweetFacebookHerald alsoreported in June ofMr Nicholson’s idea to relocate Catho pub to the bowling club site.

Catherine Hill Bay Progress Association president Sue Whyte said any new “integrated multi-usefacility”must“offer everything that we had before plus more” in order to cater for the suburb’spopulation boom.

“The population of Catherine Hill Bay is set to rise within the next 15 years by 1300 per cent,” she said.

AS IT STANDS: The now closed Catherine Hill Bay Bowling and Community Club. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

“It’s an enormous amount of people and we have to have the facilities to cater for them.”

She said the CHBPA was“currently writing to council to try and get someclarity” as there had been a bit of conjecture about whether the surf club would be upgraded to include new community space, oranew facility built on the bowling club site.

“The facilities at the northern end have to be built before the surf club,” shesaid.

“The new surf club is going to have to be moved back because it is in a hazard zone, but it is not falling into the sea in the next 15 years.

“We’d like to have playing areas, change rooms, desperately need toilets around graveyard beach, andwant to have a bowling green and other activities.”

Ms Smyth said the closed club was “sadly missed” by locals who enjoyed Sundays either on, or by the green.

“We don’t have a community facility anymore,” she said.

“Council seem pretty sincere about their hope to develop it with the sports field and bowling green.

“Hopefully that’s what is going to happen.”

Indi independent happy for Nats challenge

Cathy McGowan (R) says she looks forward to a potential challenge from Nationals’ Bridget McKenzie.Cathy McGowan has three words for the major parties trying to win her seat back.
成都桑拿

“Bring it on.”

The independent MP for Indi is also threatening to withdraw support for the coalition government if the Nationals bring Barnaby Joyce back as leader.

Nationals deputy leader Bridget McKenzie is moving her Senate electorate office nearly 300km to Wodonga in Victoria’s northeast, in preparation for a potential run at Ms McGowan’s seat.

“I hope Bridget makes her announcement pretty soon that she’s running,” Ms McGowan told reporters in Canberra on Thursday.

“I would look forward to her as a candidate.

“We’ll have National party, we’ll have Liberal party, we’ll have independents.”

Mr Joyce criticised Ms McGowan in her local newspaper for her threats about withdrawing confidence.

“Cathy, my door is always open if you wish to discuss anything with me that could be of such weight that you would make a public statement like you did,” Mr Joyce told The Border Mail.

“Alternatively, please desist with the gushy charade that is part of the disingenuous patter that you partake in every other time we meet.”

Ms McGowan said she probably was “gushy”, but there was a lot of anger in her country electorate about how the Liberals dumped Malcolm Turnbull.

Regional and rural ns would “not be happy” with a change of leadership in the Nationals, she said.

Nationals frontbencher Michelle Landry again hosed down speculation a challenge to Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack is imminent.

“Politics is a tough business, Michael’s our leader now and he has the support of our party room,” Ms Landry told reporters.

Last week she conceded Mr Joyce was likely to become leader again at some stage.

To contest the Nationals leadership, Senator McKenzie needs to be in the lower house.

Her Senate term does not expire until mid-2022.

Ms McGowan would not say if she would contest the next election.

“I’m working on a succession plan, so whether it’s this term or next term we haven’t quite got to that space,” she said.

“But at some stage I’ll stop being the member for Indi.”

Injuries as Typhoon Yutu hits Marianas

Super Typhoon Yutu has crossed over the US commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands as the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane, making it the strongest storm to hit any part of the US this year, the National Weather Service says.
成都桑拿

Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marina Islands’ delegate to US Congress, said the territory will need significant help to recover from the storm, which he said injured several people.

In a telephone interview with The Associated Press from Saipan, Sablan said he has heard reports of injuries and that people are waiting at the island’s hospital to be treated. He could not provide further details or official estimates of casualties.

“There’s a lot of damage and destruction,” Sablan said. “It’s like a small war just passed through.”

Nearly 200 federal emergency workers were in the Marianas to assist.

Maximum sustained winds of 290km/h were recorded around the eye of the storm, which passed over Tinian and Saipan early on Thursday.

Tinian suffered a direct hit. Saipan and Tinian will be unrecognisable. Fallen trees could isolate residents, and power and water outages could last weeks, the weather service warned.

Recovery efforts on Saipan and Tinian will be slow. All ports were closed, and flights into the Northern Marianas were cancelled.

The Northern Marianas have a population of about 55,000 people.

Waves of six to 12 metres were expected around the eye of the storm, and flooding is likely, forecasters said.

A typhoon warning was in effect for Saipan, Tinian and Rota. A tropical storm warning was in place for Guam and other southern islands.